Don't require root password just to look into a ticket

turbo2ltr

Member
I submitted a ticket today because the server load was very high. Now of course the first thing I do when I see high load is to see if there is a reason for it in my VPS. I felt from what I could tell, it wasn't my VPS causing the issue, so I submitted a ticket asking to look into the SSD14 node load.

As usual I got a very quick reply. Unfortunately it basically said "sorry I can't do anything until you give me your root password".

Maybe I do not understand the information available to the techs, but I would assume that they could look at the hypervisor and see if there is a container that is hogging resources? Why do I have to enable root password logins and change my root password, just so they can tell me "oh yeah it's not you".

The tech gave these reasons:
a) Confirmation of ownership. (Why? I'm not asking them to make changes, but simply asking you to look into the status of YOUR hardware.)
b) Review your current load. (just ask, I'll give you a link to a live site that shows the load without having to go through the trouble on my end)
c) Determine the source of the issue. (Wouldn't it be easier to localize it to a container by looking at ALL the containers before you go looking for the issue in a particular one? Troubleshooting 101.)

In the end I just closed the ticket as, after 30 minutes, it seems the sever has recovered and load is almost back to normal.

I just wish you guys would make provisions to use public keys instead of passwords.
 

KH-Jonathan

Director of Managed Services
Staff member
I submitted a ticket today because the server load was very high. Now of course the first thing I do when I see high load is to see if there is a reason for it in my VPS. I felt from what I could tell, it wasn't my VPS causing the issue, so I submitted a ticket asking to look into the SSD14 node load.

a) Confirmation of ownership. (Why? I'm not asking them to make changes, but simply asking you to look into the status of YOUR hardware.)
This is standard procedure for us. When a ticket is opened, a tech takes ownership of it as to not bounce it around between different people, etc. When this happens we send a reply to let you know that we're starting to look into what you sent us. Maybe it's an issue, maybe it's a simple question - we don't know yet at this point, we're just letting you know someone is on it and who you will be working with.

b) Review your current load. (just ask, I'll give you a link to a live site that shows the load without having to go through the trouble on my end)
We do this through some internal monitoring systems. More detail about checking things node-side below.

c) Determine the source of the issue. (Wouldn't it be easier to localize it to a container by looking at ALL the containers before you go looking for the issue in a particular one? Troubleshooting 101.)
We do. Standard procedure is also to get a working root password at the beginning of the ticket so that if the ticket does go through replies and even gets passed to another tech we're not fiddling around trying to get it later.

I just wish you guys would make provisions to use public keys instead of passwords.
This is in the works. I agree that this would be a far-superior way to handle support. Unfortunately getting setup to be able to work this way takes time and custom development. Great things are coming, stick around and you'll see ;)

Not every tech has access to the hypervisor itself - that's generally unnecessary and it's much safer to just keep things locked down as much as possible. We do always have folks on shift that do have this access should issues arise that need to be handled at that level, but just not every tech.

I hope this can help to clear up some of your frustrations. I do appreciate your constructive criticism. We're always looking for ways to improve and this will help us do just that.

When you want US VPS hosting, come to the experts; KnownHost.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

KH-Jonathan

Director of Managed Services
Staff member
Any update on using public key access?

I leave root password login enabled for you guys...
Unfortunately not, though we've made some big improvements to our temporary internal storage standards for these passwords.
 
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